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"Radiosensitisers and Radioprotectors"

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Silymarin

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GENERAL FEATURES

Name: Silymarin
Trade names: Flavobion[1]
Flavobion ("Spofa") is formed by a complex of flavonoids (silybin, silydianim, and silychristin), under the general name of silymarin[2]
Leviaderm® (silymarin-based cream)[3]
Source: Silymarin is a mixture of flavonolignans from the seeds of Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn (commonly known as Milk thistle)[4], containing silybinin, isosilybinin, silydianin, silychristin and the dihydroflavonol of taxifolin.[5]
Phyto-constituents
(active):
Seeds of Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn:
Flavanoids, phenols, terpenoids, tannins, taxifolin, Isosilybin, Silybin, Silychristin, Silydianin[6]
Actions
& Indications:
Pharmcological Action-
hepatoprotective in rats[7], in mice[8]
chain-breaking antioxidant[8]
Therapeutic indications:
Preclinical study-
Notes:
REFERENCES
1. Haková H, Misúrová E, Kropácová K, The effect of silymarin on concentration and total content of nucleic acids in tissues of continuously irradiated rats. Vet Med (Praha). 1996 ;41(4):113-9.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8693663
2. Gakova N, Mishurova E, Kropachova K, Effect of flavobion on tissue nucleic acids of rats irradiated with gamma rays. Biull Eksp Biol Med. 1992 ;113(3):375-9.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00783113
3. Becker-Schiebe M et al, Topical use of a Silymarin-based preparation to prevent radiodermatitis : results of a prospective study in breast cancer patients. Strahlenther Onkol. 2011 ;187(8):485-91.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00066-011-2204-z
4. Milk Thistle (Silybum marianum) by Ladas E, Kroll DJ, Kelly KM ; In : Encyclopedia of Dietary Supplements, edited by Coates PM et al, CRC Press, 2004, Page no. 467.
https://books.google.com/books?id=Sfmc-fRCj10C&pg=PA467
5. Radjabian T, Rezazadeh SH, Huseini HF, Analysis of silymarin components in the seed extracts of some milk thistle ecotypes from Iran by HPLC. Iranian Journal of Science & Technology, Transaction A 2008;Article 7,32(2):141-146.
http://ijsts.shirazu.ac.ir/article_2252_0.html
6. Atraqchi NH, Wafaa MA, Hamed AS, Preliminary phytochemical screening an in-vitro evaluation of antioxidant activity of Iraqi species of Silybum maranum seeds. Int. Res. J. Pharm. 2014; 5 (5): 378-383.
http://dx.doi.org/10.7897/2230-8407.050579
7. Muriel P et al, Silymarin protects against paracetamolinduced lipid peroxidation and liver damage. J Appl Toxicol. 1992 ;12(6):439-42.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jat.2550120613
8. Lettéron P et al, Mechanism for the protective effects of silymarin against carbon tetrachloride-induced lipid peroxidation and hepatotoxicity in mice. Evidence that silymarin acts both as an inhibitor of metabolic activation and as a chain-breaking antioxidant. Biochem Pharmacol. 1990 ;39(12):2027-34.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0006-2952(90)90625-U