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Phyllanthus amarus

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GENERAL FEATURES

Name: Phyllanthus amarus
Synonyms/Scientific names: Phyllanthus amarus Schumach. & Thonn.[1]
Phyllanthus niruri auct. non L.[1]
Synonyms/common names :
Black catnip, Carry me seed, gale of wind, hurricane seed[1]
Trade name:
Description: Family : Euphorbiaceae[1]
Extract used:
Phyto-constituents
(active):
ellagitannins : amariin;
1-galloyl-2,3-dehydrohexahydroxydiphenyl (DHHDP)-glucose;
repandusinic acid;
geraniin;
corilagin;
phyllanthusiin D;
flavonoids: rutin;
and
quercetin 3-O-glucoside.[2]
Lignans: isolintetralin (2,3-demethoxy-seco-isolintetralin diacetate);
demethylenedioxy-niranthin;
5-demethoxy-niranthin;
niranthin;
phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin[3]
phyllanthin, hypophyllanthin, niranthin, and nirtetralin[4]
Aerial Parts:
amariinic acid, a novel ellagitannin;
1-O-galloyl-2,4-dehydrohexahydroxydiphenoyl-glucopyranose elaeocarpusin, repandusinic acid A and geraniinic acid B.[5]
Actions
& Indications:
Pharmcological Action-
Hypoglycemic effect in diabetic rats[6]
hepatoprotective in rats[7]
Therapeutic indications:
It is used traditionally in treatment of gonorrhoea, diarrhoea, stomach-ache, dysentry, also used as diuretic, anti-pyretic[1]
Preclinical study-
Notes:
REFERENCES
1. Phyllanthus; In : Alphabetical Treatment of Medicinal Plants; In : Medicinal Plants, Volume 1, Plant Resources of Tropical Africa 11(1), edited by Schmelzer GH, Gurib-Fakim A, PROTA, 2008, Page no. 415.
https://books.google.com/books?id=7FJqgQ3_tnUC&pg=PA415
2. Londhe JS et al, Radioprotective properties of polyphenols from Phyllanthus amarus Linn. J. Radiat. Res. 2009; 50(4): 303–309.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1269/jrr.08096
3. Maciel MA et al, NMR Characterization of Bioactive Lignans from Phyllanthus amarus Schum & Thorn. Ann. Magn. Reson. 2007;6(3):76-82.
http://auremn.org/Annals/2007-vol6-num3/AMRn32007p76-82.pdf
4. Srivastava V et al, Separation and quantification of lignans in Phyllanthus species by a simple chiral densitometric method. J Sep Sci. 2008;31(1):47-55.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jssc.200700282
5. Foo LY, Amariinic acid and related ellagitannins from Phyllanthus amarus. Phytochemistry 1995;39(1):217-224.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0031-9422(94)00836-I
6. Raphael KR, Sabu MC, Kuttan R, Hypoglycemic effect of methanol extract of Phyllanthus amarus Schum & Thonn on alloxan induced diabetes mellitus in rats and its relation with antioxidant potential. Indian J Exp Biol. 2002 ;40(8):905-9.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12597020
7. Pramyothin P et al, Hepatoprotective activity of Phyllanthus amarus Schum. et. Thonn. extract in ethanol treated rats: in vitro and in vivo studies. J Ethnopharmacol. 2007;114(2):169-73.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2007.07.037